7.5
Our overall verdict "bronze"

Set in a sleepy American town of Redrock County in the 1980’s, American Fugitive tempts you into playing as the bad guy. Developed by Fallen Tree Games, (the guys that gave you Quell Memento, a game we reviewed back in 2013 on PlayStation Vita) American Fugitive couldn’t be any more different. Prepare to loot and shoot your way to freedom, Will Riley style…

The story starts with Will (that’s you) getting a call from his Father. He’s in trouble again and needs you. Arriving at this house you find him dead, and before you know it the cops bust in and charge you with his murder. Now a convicted killer, the only way to find out who murdered your Father is to bust out of jail and find who is responsible.

Viewed from above, Will can travel anywhere in this open world adventure either by hijacking cars or on foot. He’s an agile mover, hopping over garden gates and wading through shrubbery. Will can even sprint for a short time too, which is handy for when he needs to hot foot it from the local law enforcement officers.

By sticking to the story, waypoints keep you in check as what to do next. Completing tasks unwind the story and get you closer to who’s involved in your Father’s death. Tasks are varied and have you exploring the whole of Redrock County. It’s a vast laid back town, so much so that when cruising down the main street I found myself stuck behind a tractor at one point. Action certain does hot up though, with locals highly vigilant of your actions and with constant threats by the local sheriff around the corner, you need to be on your toes.

Getting busted isn’t too difficult and can be very annoying as you can be reported for the slightest of traffic offences or even for clipping a lamppost. Once busted you also lose what’s ever in your inventory too. That being said, if you’ve hijacked a decent set of wheels then losing the police shouldn’t be too much of a problem. Driving up dirt tracks, performing handbrake turns in somebody’s front garden or hiding in bushes is one way to lose them, but beware – these chases can go on for ages. Think of that 80’s classic TV show Dukes of Hazzard and those wacky car chases and you’ll get the picture. Because of this, driving in American Fugitive is hugely fun and with a garage full of muscle cars laying around to steal, the fun never runs dry.

It’s a beautifuly designed town and the changing from day to night adds real atmosphere. It’s also really appealing playing a bad guy. Want to bust into someone’s home and have a good rummage around? Well that’s what American Fugitive is all about. You can be as good or as damn evil as you wish, but it’s all done in a tasteful way.

CONCLUSION

Breaking the law and crazy car chases makes American Fugitive highly fun. If you’re looking for a GTA experince with an RPG twist then this won’t disappoint. Just drive carefully.

Lizard rating: 7.5/10

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Blondlizard

Blondlizard is from London. His love of gaming continued onto the Sega Mega Drive, Gameboy, Sega Saturn, Dreamcast, PlayStation 1,2,3 and 4, PSP and PS Vita. Blondlizard loves his racing games and is yet to play a RPG, but tells us he is willing to change. His favourite inventions are the wireless controller and American size crisp packets.